History and Current Development of Project Management

Ever since there have been work endeavors that could be defined as “projects”, people have been using management tools and techniques. After all, without some form of planning, organization and communication strategy, nothing can be effectively accomplished. However, the discipline that we now think of as project management was first formalized in the 1950s.

The original planning concepts were developed for large engineering, construction, and military projects. They included mathematical tools for calculating and managing costs, visual tools such as charts for prioritizing schedule activities, and evaluation tools for determining project scope. By the late 1960s, several project management organizations including IPMA and PMI had been formed. Over the next couple of decades a substantial body of knowledge was developed and published. Several institutes also began offering certification in project management.

How It Has Evolved

Today, project managers have carved out a niche in many public and private industries. Financial institutions, non-profit organizations, and software development firms are just a few of the industries that have joined engineering, architecture, and other traditional fields in using PM principles. Because of the wider application of project management, techniques have changed dramatically. Some tools from the past (especially diagrams) are still in use, but other simplistic tools have been replaced with complex software applications. Concepts like risk management and communications planning have been added to the repertoire of project managers at larger organizations.

Other factors that have impacted the development of PM methodology include:

Ambitious Scope: Today, many projects are larger in scope than ever before – and global in scale. Managing a virtual team that is distributed in far flung locations requires a different approach than overseeing small, local projects. So does dealing with the risks inherent in relying on suppliers and project partners in countries that vary widely in terms of economic and political stability, workplace culture, and business practices.

Better Technology: Software that is specifically designed to evaluate, plan, administer, communicate about, and track projects has been a boon to PMs in every industry. Beyond this, collaborative tools such as video conferencing have enabled faster and more effective communication for multi-location projects.

Speed to Market: Innovations in lean manufacturing and supply chain management along with expectations for a quick turnaround on product development have significantly affected how projects are managed. The software industry is the most obvious example, but other fields are following suit. Agile project management is a methodology that has been created as a result of these market pressures. The PMI has just rolled out an Agile Certification course in response to the growing interest in this fast, highly flexible way of managing projects.

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