Search results for: Schedule Activity

Finish-to-Finish

Finish-to-finish, also known by the two letter abbreviation of FF, refers to the particular and specific long term and logical relationship exists between one particular schedule activity and another particular schedule activity. In this relationship, the succeeding activity cannot finish until the preceding activity has ultimately been concluded. In some instances, the finish to finish estimation can take place at the start of the project. The project team can do a careful analysis of all of the estimated finish dates for the entire listing of schedule events that will take place throughout the life of the project. Then , the finish to finish for each individual gap of schedule activities can then be determined by subtracting the start date of one specific schedule activity from the end date of the preceding one. Additionally, the finish to finish can be modified by adjusting the expected start date of one following activity or attempting to modify the finish date of the preceding activity.

This term is defined in the 3rd and the 4th edition of the PMBOK.

Critical Activity

The term critical activity refers to any particular schedule activity that happens to be part of a critical path that takes place within a project schedule. Critical activities are most commonly determined through the implementation and utilization of the of the critical path method (described as part of a separate entry). It is important to consider the usage of the term “critical ” in regards to project management functionality is rarely used in the context that one would find in a standard dictionary. When described typically and in common usage, the term critical can refer to something that is essential, something that is vital, or something of extreme importance. However, the term critical rarely means this in the context of project management. In project management terms, critical (such as critical activity) refers to the primary, such as being on the primary (or critical path), the main path of the life of an activity.

This term is defined in the 3rd and the 4th edition of the PMBOK.

Schedule Data

The collection of information for describing and controlling the schedule is called the schedule data.  It includes at least the schedule milestones, schedule activities, activity attributes, and documentation of all identifies assumptions and constraints.

In project management, schedule data could also include items such as histograms, cash-flow projections, and order and delivery schedules.  In the project management, the schedule data will be reviewed and updated in the control schedule process. It is updated and compiled into schedule model to reflect actual progress of the project and remaining work to be completed.

The scheduling tool and the supporting schedule data are used in conjunction with manual methods or other project management software to perform schedule network analysis to generate an updated project schedule. The updated project schedule will be generated from the schedule model populated with updated schedule data to reflect the schedule change and manage the project.

On the other hand, the resource breakdown structure is a hierarchical representation of resources by the category and type. Examples of resource categories include labor, material, equipment, and supplies. Resource types may include the skill level, grade level, or other information as appropriate to the project. The resource breakdown structure is useful for organizing and reporting project schedule data with resource utilization information.

This term is defined in the 5th edition of the PMBOK.

Schedule Data

The collection of information for describing and controlling the schedule is called the schedule data.  It includes at least the schedule milestone, schedule activities, activity attributes, and documentation of all identifies assumptions and constraints. In project management, schedule data could also include items such as histograms, cash-flow projections, and order and delivery schedules.

In the project management, the schedule data will be reviewed and updated in the control schedule process. It is updated and compiled into schedule model to reflect actual progress of the project and remaining work to be completed. The scheduling tool and the supporting schedule data are used in conjunction with manual methods or other project management software to perform schedule network analysis to generate an updated project schedule.

The updated project schedule will be generated from the schedule model populated with updated schedule data to reflect the schedule change and manage the project. On the other hand, the resource breakdown structure is a hierarchical representation of resources by the category and type.

Examples of resource categories include labor, material, equipment, and supplies. Resource types may include the skill level, grade level, or other information as appropriate to the project. The resource breakdown structure is useful for organizing and reporting project schedule data with resource utilization information.

This term is defined in the 5th edition of the PMBOK.

Activity Sequencing [Process]

The term activity sequencing refers within the context of project management to a dual process. Initially, activity sequencing involves a specific process of the identification of dependencies among a series of schedule activities. The next step of activity sequencing involves the documentation of the said series of dependencies among those schedule activities. More specifically, activity sequencing involves the chronicling the dependencies among these schedule activities and putting them into a logical order. Activity sequencing also involves a careful examination of the relationships between schedule activities and their precedence relationships, which is also provides a tangible benefit to the development of an accurate schedule. Some techniques of activity sequencing that are particularly effective include precedence diagramming method, arrow diagramming method, schedule network templates, dependency determination, and the application of leads and lags. Some outputs from activity sequencing include project network schedule diagrams, activity list updates, activity attributes updates, and requested changes.

This term is defined in the 3rd edition of the PMBOK but not in the 4th.