Scope Planning

Scope planning refers to a project management process that defines boundaries and deliverables. The basic matrix of a scope planning analysis consists of three main categories: Initiation, planning, and definition, with two control categories: Verification, and change control interspersed between the three main categories.
Initiation inputs contain program deliverable description, strategic planning, program selection criteria, and historical information. Tools and techniques include program selection methods and expert judgment. The output of the initiation phase will include a program charter, the identification and assignment of a program director, and the identification of known constraints and assumptions. The planning category covers descriptions on deliverables, the program charter, constraints, and assumptions. Tools and techniques involved in this category include deliverable analysis, a benefit/cost analysis, the identification of alternatives. The final main category includes a statement of scope, a definition of assumptions and constraints, and other planning outputs and historical information. Tools and techniques involved include work breakdown structure templates and decomposition. The output of definition is work breakdown structure, and the defined scope section of the project management plan.
Two control devises, verification and change control are interspersed between the main categories of scope planning. Verification’s inputs are work results, and deliverable documentation. Inspection is its sole tools and technique. Formal acceptance is verification’s output, and is necessary to advance the project management plan to the next level.
Change control is situated between planning and definition. Its inputs are comprised of work breakdown structure, performance reports, change requests, and the scope management plan. Tools and techniques include the scope change control system, performance measurements and additional planning when indicated. The outputs of change control are changes in scope, corrective actions, and lessons learned entered in the knowledge base for other project management considerations.

This term is defined in the 3rd edition of the PMBOK but not in the 4th.

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